Quite often, with hearing loss, it is such a gradual condition, that it is family members or friends who notice a problem before the person themselves. This is usually because they are the ones having to repeat themselves which can sometimes be frustrating and may cause tension.

Hearing loss can affect everyone including loved ones and friends. If you are concerned about your family member or friend’s hearing, here are some questions you may like to ask yourself:

helping-a-loved-one
  • Am I worried that they are not enjoying social events as much as they used to because they are having trouble hearing?
  • Is my enjoyment of activities reduced because I am worrying that my partner is having some trouble hearing and not enjoying themselves fully?
  • Do I need to repeat parts of conversations when out socially so my partner can join in?
  • Is the TV up at a volume that is actually a little too loud for me?
  • Does my partner always give the phone to me to talk as they cannot hear well on the phone?
  • Do I get sometimes frustrated by my partner’s difficulty hearing?
  • Do I worry that others may think my partner is being rude or just ignoring people, when I actually know it is because they haven’t heard the question / comment?
  • Do we not go out as often as I would like because my partner doesn’t enjoy it?

Hearing loss can be quite draining on a significant other as they often have to fill in the gaps or be the one to repeat themselves. It is just as important to relationships to sometimes be honest about the effects of hearing loss and encourage the person to book in for a hearing assessment.

Since realising that my hearing had deteriorated a few years ago, to the extent that my hearing loss was affecting my ability to distinguish words and sounds correctly, or to actively take part in family gatherings, my hearing aids have given me a lot more confidence in every day life.

I have been very pleased and satisfied with the aids fitted by Kelly and Pavel, and also their friendliness and professionalism in follow up care.

Pamela Hoy, 74

Some possible ways to talk about hearing problems with your loved one.

Some things that may help…

Possibly talk about a time where you may have perceived things differently, e.g. when we were at the birthday party yesterday, could you understand John across the table when he made that joke? I noticed I had to repeat the punchline to you.

Use the commons signs of hearing loss to talk about things you may have noticed. Maybe take the Hearing Test Online together and talk about the results. You could always book in for the free hearing tests together and we can test you and your partner and go through the results together.

When you are asked to repeat, possibly gently suggest that it is happening more often and it may be time to have their hearing checked.

We really encourage family members to come along to hearing appointments too for support and also to give their opinion on different difficult hearing situations.

It is a statistic that people wait almost 7 years to do anything about their hearing loss. In reality this is an incredibly long time. Time where conversations have been missed, secrets not shared and life maybe become duller for both partners and family. In addition, the actual health of the ear for the person with a hearing loss is deteriorating by not being stimulated. See Auditory Deprivation

One of the best things you can do is encourage your loved one to have a test and speak to us about helping them hear better.

Simply call us on 8331 8047, email on info@hearingsense.com.au or book online. You can make the difference.